PRESS

"Soprano Natalie Aroyan gave one of her finest OA performances as Boccanegra's long-lost daughter

Amelia Grimaldi. Her voluptuous tone and fluid phrasing created a vivacious portrayal

of the opera's most appealing character."

CONTACT

Management

Graham Pushee

 

graham@artsmanagement.com.au

www.artsmanagement.com.au

 

Tel: +61 2 9211 9422

Alternatively, complete the contact form to get in touch with Natalie.

Soprano Natalie Aroyan conquers the acrobatic vocal demands Verdi wrote into Odabella’s score. She does not waver, even in her opening two-octave runs, which she has to dive into without any easing in or warming up.

The Plus Ones

Attila - Opera Australia 2020

In her debut as Odabella, Natalie Aroyan demonstrated panache in her coloratura and versatility in emotions. Her impressive range, with plenty of spin and excellent control particularly into her chest, was a sensory delight to audiences ... if her vocal effortlessness in Oh! Nel fuggente nuvolo is anything to go by, Ms Aroyan will be gracing international stages with Odabella in no time.

Theatre Travels

Attila - Opera Australia 2020

The heroine of the story is Italian Odabella played by local soprano Natalie Aroyan. As great as any international singer, Aroyan easily surpassed the full orchestra and chorus in volume, fierce in her interpretation and completely believable in her dramatic skills, willing to die for her country, enough to knock the socks of Attlia and stop him in his tracks. She was absolutely outstanding.

Sydney Arts Guide

Attila - Opera Australia 2020

He [Attila] meets his match, however, in the warrior woman Odabella who captures his heart with her display of courage and beauty – but who’s secretly plotting her revenge for his slaying of her father and, she believes, her lover Foresto.

She’s played by Armenian-Australian soprano Natalie Aroyan whose voice trickles, like golden honey, up and down the profoundly sticky register of difficult vocal tricks Verdi has given her character, until we all swoon before her.

The Daily Telegraph

Attila - Opera Australia 2020

…AND THE SINGING

Both Aroyan and Torre made debuts in Attila, which was a big call to cast two of the four principals as “newbies”, but it didn’t raise a ruffle.

Aroyan was impressive as Odabella, confident on stage, dramatically rich in her delivery of the feisty role, and had a voice that continued to give. Her Oh! Nel fuggente nuvolo / O father, is your image not imprinted on the fleeting clouds? in Act 1, where she laments her father is superb.

Her rapport with both Taras Berezhansky as Attila and Torre as Foresto was believable.

Arts Hub

Attila - Opera Australia 2020

As his eventual nemesis, Obadella, Natalie Aroyan navigated the part’s wide vocal range with expressive colour, warmth and force...although their [Diego Torre] voice types are very different, the duets between these two were peak musical moments.

Sydney Morning Herald

Attila - Opera Australia 2020

As Odabella, soprano Natalie Aroyan’s rich array of tone colours and agile coloratura conveyed her character’s determination and resourcefulness.

The Australian

Attila - Opera Australia 2020

As in many early Verdi operas, the soprano role, Odabella, is a notorious voice breaker: the dangers of the role are immediately apparent in the first aria in the prologue, ‘Santi di patria’ (sensationally recorded by Joan Sutherland in 1963), where the voice leaps well over two octaves while having to sail triumphantly over a pulsating orchestra. Natalie Aroyan’s career has been carefully managed by Opera Australia. She has distinguished herself in important roles including Aida, Mimi in La Bohème, Amelia in Simon Boccanegra, Micaëla in Carmen, Desdemona in Otello, and Eva in Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg. Odabella takes her into new vocal territory, calling for dramatic vocal thrust coupled with flexibility. Yet her Act I aria could be by Bellini, requiring all the skills and finesse of true bel canto singing (accompanied by expressive solo instrumental playing). It is a voice of plangent beauty, with a darkish tone colour but enough bright ‘ping’ in the middle and upper range to sail across the orchestra and chorus in the big finales. She is also blessed with an attractive stage persona, creating an immediate sympathetic rapport with the audience.

Australian Book Review

Attila - Opera Australia 2020

Oddly, the characters as they emerged in this production revealed Attila as a decent, if autocratic, chap whilst the Italian men continually break promises and are plagued by irrational jealousy.

Which leaves Odabella as the straightforward heroine of the shining hour. Made to hit her big Verdian straps from the moment she opens her mouth, Natalie Aroyan, in her role debut, embraced the part in its totality and aroused the normally polite Sydney audience to Italianate heights of whistling and cheering. Could this have been partly a coronavirus consequence? For there was undoubtedly an acknowledgement that attendance at such a large gathering in mid-March 2020 was a) daring and b) potentially the last for a while.

Certainly, though, the enthusiasm for this youthful product of Opera Australia's development system was justified. Could there have been a slight fading of her vocal power towards the end? Not en route, as Aroyan managed the difficult balance between the three men in her life – the peremptory Attila (Taras Berezhansky) who assumes the right to take her in marriage, the ever-jealous Foresto (Diego Torre) who assumes the worst of her, and her dead father, killed by Attila himself on his black horse in D-wok's filmed backdrop, whom she mourns in a glorious, cor anglais accompanied solo. In duet with the quietly passionate tenor, Torre, distant thoughts of Dame Joan and the Pav were conjured.

Bachtrack

Attila - Opera Australia 2020

Making her debut as Odabella, company favourite Natalie Aroyan had ample opportunity to demonstrate the many qualities of her impressive soprano. Round and richly coloured, with plenty of metal and an impressive chest register, it’s the kind of spinto voice that doesn’t come along all that often. ... she brought plenty of dramatic panache to the vengeful Odabella, and the Act 1 romanza, Oh! Nel fuggente nuvolo, was a model of Verdian sweep and line. This was a very promising debut indeed, and I can’t wait to see her take on the composer’s Leonoras or Elisabetta.

Limelight Magazine

Attila - Opera Australia 2020

The soprano Natalie Aroyan has a large instrument with an easy and very sonorous projection which works wonders in the title role, especially in the small setting of this theater whose acoustics multiplies the natural impact.

Anclase: La musique au jour le jour

AIDA :: Verdi Festival :: Buessto , Italy 2019

Making her debut as Eva, Natalie Aroyan sang with great feeling, completely in step with Holten’s understanding of Eva. It’s a voice with a not inconsiderable amount of steel in it – one wonders if there’s an Elsa or Elisabeth in her future – which the soprano wielded like a rapier when defying the men in her life.

Limelight Magazine

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg - Opera Australia 2018

Natalie Aroyan turned the often milk-and-water Eva into something much more characterful (her response to her father “An obedient child speaks only when asked” was deliciously marinaded in sarcasm) with some lovely unforced singing to boot – her solo at the start of the quintet was especially delightful.

Bachtrack

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg - Opera Australia 2018

Natalie Aroyan also has the kind of voice that is a sheer pleasure to hear. There was nothing in the role of Eva that was not within the easy capacity of her full, creamy tone. She is dramatically accomplished even though she did have the dubious task of convincing us that a girl who agrees to being given away by her father to the winning Meistersinger, or remain unwed, would ultimately reject the man she loves because he succumbs to the vanities of being admitted to their ranks.

Classic Melbourne

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg - Opera Australia 2018

Ms Aroyan’s vocal strength and acting abilities were evident throughout the opera. She has a powerful instrument which is capable of reaching bell-like highs and plunging seamlessly into a dark and velvety lower register. We can eagerly look forward to her future appearances with OA.

Concerto Net

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg - Opera Australia 2018

​Soprano Natalie Aroyan shines as dear Eva, despite the somewhat underwritten nature of the role. Maintaining a serene presence, Aroyan exhibits a voluptuous, well controlled soprano that leaves the audience wanting more.

Simon Paris Man in Chair

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg - Opera Australia 2018

Locals also shone brightly, particularly Natalie Aroyan, who interpreted Eva with a bright, powerful soprano and determined streak.

Arts Hub

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg - Opera Australia 2018

Natalie Aroyan was deliciously radiant as Eva.

Herald Sun

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg - Opera Australia 2018

Natalie Aroyan’s Eva was gloriously sung and impetuously performed: this Eva is to be reckoned with, I thought. I wasn’t wrong. I hope to hear more of Aroyan. There is definitely an Elsa or Senta in the making there.

Australian Book Review

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg - Opera Australia 2018

"The opera background of all the soloists was evident in voice colouration and dramatic expression...

Of all the soloists, it is the soprano who has the most taxing part. The voluptuous voice of Armenian Australian soprano Natalie Aroyan is almost enough to make you wonder whether it is necessary to pay a small fortune to hear Anna Netrebko when we have such talent in Australia. A creamy sound with, in general, a nicely rounded, floating top register, fullness throughout the range, and excellent breath control served Verdi’s intentions well. There was weight of sound that soared above choir and orchestra without the obtrusive vibrato that sometimes accompanies it. The earnest plea at the beginning of the Libera me was only one example of her ability to infuse the text with colour and drama."

Classic Melbourne

VERDI REQUIEM - Royal Melbourne Philharmonic 2017

A stand out performance comes from Natalie Aroyan who returns to the role of Micaëla, having taken on the village maiden for John Bell's traditional stage production in 2016. Her beautiful soprano voice conveys an innocence and love in her Act 3 aria presented from high above the stage, as she emerges from her hiding spot. Aroyan's dramatization of the role has a delightful nuance and subtlty to convey Micaëla's joy at hoping to find Don José, her fear of the soldiers and the precariousness of her hiding spot, and the disappointment at the rejection of affection.

Broadway World Review

CARMEN on the Harbour 2017

Don Jose is beautifully sung and credibly performed by Basque tenor Andeka Gorrotxategi. And it’s not an easy role to pull off: as well as falling for Carmen and going rogue from the Guardia with the rebels, he also has to betray Natalie Aroyan’s Michaela. This is quite the task as Aroyan makes every moment of the role count and her great aria, sung from high above the stage, is electrifying.

Stage Noise

Carmen on the Harbour 2017

Whilst the souvenir program lists an imported artist in the role of Amelia, opening night saw a change to the wonderful Australian Soprano Natalie Aroyan. Aroyan is also listed on the Opera Australia website so it seems the swap is permanent and it is a treat to get to hear the local in the lead role. Aroyan gives Amelia a passionate sustained strength as she strives for peace between the Patricians and Plebeians, in particular saving Boccanegra from Adorno's blade twice. She has a beautiful ringing purity to match the innocence of the orphan girl who turns out to be Boccanegra's daughter, and therefore Fiesco's granddaughter. She exudes sensitivity and also a strength to show love, hope, sadness and compassion, and also stand up to the fighting men. For what can assumed to be a late change in casting, sometime after the programs were printed, Aroyan is stunning and the only give away to the change is the program and the announcement at the commencement of the performance.”

Broadway World Review

SIMON BOCCANEGRA - JULY 2016

Soprano Natalie Aroyan gave one of her finest OA performances as Boccanegra’s long-lost daughter Amelia Grimaldi. Her voluptuous tone and fluid phrasing created a vivacious portrayal of the opera’s most appealing character.

The Australian

SIMON BOCCANEGRA - JULY 2016

Micaëla, a country girl was sensitively and superbly played by Armenian-Australian soprano Natalie Aroyan. She was beautiful; mesmerizing, breathtaking really, fragile and full of courage and conviction.

Her final outstanding aria in Act two was a bravura performance, she appeared so incredibly vulnerable and her song was so heartfelt the audience was entirely swept up in the scene

Culture Concept Circle

CARMEN MAY 2014

The true excellence of this production lay in the cast, who were vocally superb and generally convincing in their acting… Natalie Aroyan was drafted in late as Amelia Grimaldi, but one wouldn’t have known it from her assured stage presence and confident delivery.

Bachtrack Review

SIMON BOCCANEGRA - JULY 2016

Australian-Armenian Natalie Aroyan brought a fragile naivety to Mimi, with moments of voluminous soprano splendour. Her conversational Mi chiamano Mimi was full of shy smiles and expressively stretched phrases.

The West Australian

LA BOHEME - OCT 2013

As Mimi, Armenian-Australian Natalie Aroyan sang with a voice rich in colour and complexity, creating lines that balanced naturalness with expressive shape.
She has thrilling sounds in the top register and dramatic firmness in the lower notes of the last act. Her characterisation was more of warmth than pallor and she maintained a centred stage presence moulded around the richness of her voice

Sydney Morning Herald

LA BOHEME - JAN 2016

Natalie Aroyan's Micaela sings her disapproval with such golden fluidity and ease that prudishness evaporates…Aroyan capturing the purity of line with attractive simplicity of sound.

Sydney Morning Herald

CARMEN - JUNE 2016

Perhaps the big surprise on the opening night of this season of “Simon Boccanegra” was that the role of Amelia Grimaldi, who turns out to be Boccanegra’s daughter and Jacopo Fiesco’s grand-daughter, was sung, superbly, by Opera Australia principal, Natalie Aroyan, instead of the much anticipated Italian soprano, Barbara Frittoli, who had actually begun rehearsals but then had to return home due to urgent family circumstances.

It will surprise no one who saw her charming portrayal of Micaela, in John Bell’s recent production of “Carmen”, to learn that Aroyan, who had stepped into the role at short notice, sang magnificently and gave such an assured performance, that few in the audience would have realised that this was her role debut in the part

Canberra Critics Circle

SIMON BOCCANEGRA - JULY 2016

As his long-lost daughter Amelia, Natalie Aroyan has comparable vocal warmth and comeliness, projecting rounded colour and balance of tone alongside humility of character.

Sydney Morning Herald

SIMON BOCCANEGRA - JULY 2016

Armenian-Australian Natalie Aroyan used her beautifully nuanced soprano, so golden and warm, as Amelia, the Doge’s daughter who manages to dissuade her lover from assassinating her father (and you thought your life was complicated).”

The Daily Telegraph

SIMON BOCCANEGRA - JULY 2016

Natalie Aroyan as Micaela, impressed with her sweet, clear soprano, and her ability to capture the fragility and resilience of the young woman sent on an impossible mission to persuade Don Jose to return home to comfort his dying mother.

Canberra Critics Circle

CARMEN - FEB 2014

At last night’s opening Natalie Aroyan as Michaela rivalled the splendour and command of Carmen and threatened to upstage her. Her voice resounded with clarity and confidence.

Daily Review

CARMEN - FEB 2014

The strong cast delivers a convincing performance, with exceptional contributions by Natalie Aroyan as Mimi, Jose Carbo as Marcello and Rachelle Durkin as Musetta.
Aroyan’s warm, floating sound is perfect for Mimi’s character, bringing a vulnerable tenderness to the role.
Her Act I solo was a highlight of the night, intensely expressive and heartfelt yet never losing its tonal beauty. Carbo sings with a rich, lyrical quality and effortless control and is a pleasure to watch from beginning to end.

The Australian

LA BOHEME - OCT 2013

Chief honours amongst the supporting cast must go to Natalie Aroyan, singing Michaëla … She’s a Moffatt Oxenbould Young Artist who has studied with Freni, Bonynge and Te Kanawa and it shows. Her big aria was winningly sung with excellent diction and clarity, building a more confident character than can sometimes be the case. She takes over the role properly from February 6 and on this showing will be well worth a trip.

Limelight Magazine

CARMEN - FEB 2014

Natalie Aroyan was a radiant Micaëla, and ‘Je dis que rien ne m’épouvante’ was the vocal highlight of the evening.

Australian Book Review

CARMEN - MAY 2014

Natalie Aroyan’s portrayal of Micaela deserves more than just an honourable mention. She handled the third act’s difficult aria with style and grace and was entirely compelling as the heart-breaking, loveable girl next door, who comes so close to redeeming the doomed Jose.

Cut Common Live Review

CARMEN - APRIL 2014

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CONTACT

Management

Graham Pushee

 

graham@artsmanagement.com.au

www.artsmanagement.com.au

 

Tel: +61 2 9211 9422

Alternatively, complete the contact form to get in touch with Natalie.

 

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